Best Tea for Acid Reflux and Bloating
Bloating

Best Tea for Acid Reflux and Bloating

Reece Mander MSc Clinical Nutrition

Reece Mander

3 min

Acid reflux and bloating are two of the most common digestive issues that can cause discomfort and pain. But while there are many over-the-counter medications available to treat these symptoms, some people prefer to use natural remedies like herbal teas where possible.

In this blog article, we will discuss the best tea for acid reflux and bloating, with a focus on mucilage-producing herbs, such as marshmallow and slippery elm.

Herbal Teas for Acid Reflux and Bloating

Herbal teas have been used for centuries to treat a variety of health issues, including digestive problems. Some herbal teas can help improve digestion and soothe stomach issues and some work to reduce bloating, gas and nausea. When it comes to acid reflux and bloating, there are several herbal teas that can be beneficial.

Ginger Tea For Acid Reflux

Ginger tea is a popular choice for people with acid reflux and bloating. Ginger rhizome has anti-inflammatory properties that can help reduce inflammation in the digestive tract.

Chamomile Tea For Acid Reflux

Chamomile tea is another option that can help soothe the digestive system and reduce inflammation. It has a calming effect on the body which may help reflux that is made worse by stress.

Licorice Team For Acid Reflux

Licorice tea can help increase the mucus coating of the esophageal lining, which may help reduce the effects of backflowing stomach acid.

Turmeric tea for both acid reflux and bloating

Turmeric tea has anti-inflammatory properties that can help reduce inflammation in the digestive tract.

Marshmallow Root Tea

Marshmallow root tea is made from the root of the marshmallow plant. The root contains a high amount of mucilage, a sticky substance that can help soothe and protect the digestive tract. When consumed, marshmallow root tea can create a soothing and protecting layer on the surface of the esophagus, which can help reduce the effects of backflowing stomach acid. Marshmallow root tea can also help reduce inflammation in the digestive tract.

Slippery Elm Tea

Slippery elm tea is made from the inner bark of the slippery elm tree. The inner bark contains a high amount of mucilage, which can help soothe and protect the digestive tract. When mixed with water, slippery elm produces a gel that has great coating properties. Drinking slippery elm tea for acid reflux coats the inner lining of the esophageal tract, soothing and protecting it from further inflammation. It also can stimulate mucus production, which can further reduce irritation of the stomach and esophagus.

Several studies have investigated the effects of mucilage-producing herbs like marshmallow and slippery elm on digestive issues like acid reflux and bloating.

A study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology found that marshmallow root extract had a protective effect on the esophagus and reduced the severity of acid reflux symptoms in rats

 

Another study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine found that slippery elm bark was effective in reducing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) 

Conclusion

 

Herbal teas can be a natural and effective way to soothe digestive issues like acid reflux and bloating. Mucilage-producing herbs like marshmallow and slippery elm can be particularly beneficial, as they can help protect and soothe the digestive tract. While herbal teas can be a safe and effective remedy for digestive issues, it is important to talk to a doctor before trying any new herbal remedies, especially if you are taking prescription medications.

References:

 Madisch, A., Heydenreich, C. J., Wieland, V., & Hufnagel, R. (2004). Treatment of heartburn and acid reflux associated with nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 94(1), 75-81.
2
 Langmead, L., Dawson, C., Hawkins, C., Banna, N., Loo, S., & Rampton, D. S. (2002). Antioxidant effects of herbal therapies used by patients with inflammatory bowel disease: an in vitro study. Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics, 16(2), 197-205.

 

Reece Mander MSc Clinical Nutrition

Reece Mander

Content Writer

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